Showing posts tagged: hummingbirds

  • Tip on Taking Pictures of Hummingbirds
I got an ask on taking pictures of hummingbirds. Its really freaking hard and I’m not great at it, but here are some of my tips. 
Stalk them. Hummingbirds take tons of breaks (at least Anna’s Hummingbrids here in SF) and they usually have a favorite perch. For instance I saw that hummingbird above EVERY DAY in the same exact spot for over a year. Once you know where they will be go wait and be patient.
Put your focus point in the middle of the camera if possible. Then use continuous focusing and take A TON of photos. I delete 20 for every decent shot I get.
Put your camera in burst mode!
The aperture / shutter speed / ISO balance is the most important. I HATE high ISO, but this is the one time I will sacrifice. Put your ISO up around 400-800 so you can narrow your aperture and get more depth of field and still take a fast shot. When they are flying I usually use 1/400-1/800 and their wings will still be blurry!
Solid article with more great information on taking pictures of hummingbirds.
(Taken in San Francisco from 2007 - 2013)
  • Tip on Taking Pictures of Hummingbirds
I got an ask on taking pictures of hummingbirds. Its really freaking hard and I’m not great at it, but here are some of my tips. 
Stalk them. Hummingbirds take tons of breaks (at least Anna’s Hummingbrids here in SF) and they usually have a favorite perch. For instance I saw that hummingbird above EVERY DAY in the same exact spot for over a year. Once you know where they will be go wait and be patient.
Put your focus point in the middle of the camera if possible. Then use continuous focusing and take A TON of photos. I delete 20 for every decent shot I get.
Put your camera in burst mode!
The aperture / shutter speed / ISO balance is the most important. I HATE high ISO, but this is the one time I will sacrifice. Put your ISO up around 400-800 so you can narrow your aperture and get more depth of field and still take a fast shot. When they are flying I usually use 1/400-1/800 and their wings will still be blurry!
Solid article with more great information on taking pictures of hummingbirds.
(Taken in San Francisco from 2007 - 2013)
  • Tip on Taking Pictures of Hummingbirds
I got an ask on taking pictures of hummingbirds. Its really freaking hard and I’m not great at it, but here are some of my tips. 
Stalk them. Hummingbirds take tons of breaks (at least Anna’s Hummingbrids here in SF) and they usually have a favorite perch. For instance I saw that hummingbird above EVERY DAY in the same exact spot for over a year. Once you know where they will be go wait and be patient.
Put your focus point in the middle of the camera if possible. Then use continuous focusing and take A TON of photos. I delete 20 for every decent shot I get.
Put your camera in burst mode!
The aperture / shutter speed / ISO balance is the most important. I HATE high ISO, but this is the one time I will sacrifice. Put your ISO up around 400-800 so you can narrow your aperture and get more depth of field and still take a fast shot. When they are flying I usually use 1/400-1/800 and their wings will still be blurry!
Solid article with more great information on taking pictures of hummingbirds.
(Taken in San Francisco from 2007 - 2013)

Tip on Taking Pictures of Hummingbirds

I got an ask on taking pictures of hummingbirds. Its really freaking hard and I’m not great at it, but here are some of my tips. 

  • Stalk them. Hummingbirds take tons of breaks (at least Anna’s Hummingbrids here in SF) and they usually have a favorite perch. For instance I saw that hummingbird above EVERY DAY in the same exact spot for over a year. Once you know where they will be go wait and be patient.
  • Put your focus point in the middle of the camera if possible. Then use continuous focusing and take A TON of photos. I delete 20 for every decent shot I get.
  • Put your camera in burst mode!
  • The aperture / shutter speed / ISO balance is the most important. I HATE high ISO, but this is the one time I will sacrifice. Put your ISO up around 400-800 so you can narrow your aperture and get more depth of field and still take a fast shot. When they are flying I usually use 1/400-1/800 and their wings will still be blurry!

Solid article with more great information on taking pictures of hummingbirds.

(Taken in San Francisco from 2007 - 2013)

Up Close and Personal With an Anna’s Hummingbird
I can’t believe this picture is on the radar! I am so excited and humbled - and it seems like a perfect time to share my favorite picture of a hummingbird I’ve taken.
To all everyone who’s followed me for a while THANK YOU, to all the new folks THANK YOU.
PS - if you take original photos message me so I can check your stuff out.
Peace and Love,
-Cam
(Lake Tahoe, California - 8/2011)

Up Close and Personal With an Anna’s Hummingbird

I can’t believe this picture is on the radar! I am so excited and humbled - and it seems like a perfect time to share my favorite picture of a hummingbird I’ve taken.

To all everyone who’s followed me for a while THANK YOU, to all the new folks THANK YOU.

PS - if you take original photos message me so I can check your stuff out.

Peace and Love,

-Cam

(Lake Tahoe, California - 8/2011)